Arab billionaires’ wealth rises to $121bn in 2011

The Arab world boasts 36 billionaires with an accumulated wealth of more than $121bn, according to a new rich list published by Forbes Middle East on Sunday.

According to its Arab billionaires rankings, the total wealth of the region’s billionaires rose to $121.3bn from last year’s figure of $117.6bn.

Alwaleed's fortune is US$21.3bn, according to his private office.

Topping the ranking was Saudi Arabia’s Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Al Saud with an estimated fortune of $18bn, although figures verified by his private office to Arabian Business said Alwaleed’s fortune was estimated at $21.3bn.

Prince Alwaleed was followed in second place by Lebanese-Brazilian billionaire Joseph Safra with $13.8bn to his name.

Both Saudi Arabia and Lebanon led the way on the list with eight billionaires each.

Despite recent political turmoil, Egypt was runner up with seven billionaires, followed by the UAE with a total of four.

However, this year’s major headline was newcomer to the billionaires club, Morocco, which entered the ranking with three billionaires – Miloud Chaabi, Othman Benjelloun and Anas Sefrioui.

Kuwait ranked sixth with two billionaires, Bassam and Kutayba Alghanim, although the wealthy Al-Kharafi family was removed from the ranking following a formal request from the Kharafi Group.

Jordan, Syria, Iraq and Sudan also featured in the ranking with one billionaire each.

One of the success stories this year was Sulaiman Al-Rajhi & family, ranked in fifth place with a family net worth of $5.9bn.

The Saudi banking tycoon-turned-philanthropist made headlines last year with an unprecedented decision to relinquish much of his fortune; distributing his wealth among family and donating a significant proportion to charity.

Also highlighted was Moroccan frontrunner Miloud Chaabi, ranked 10th with a fortune of $2.9bn.

Following a religious education, he started working at the age of 15 as a shepherd, then as a farmer, before moving into the construction industry. Today, he leads the Moroccan billionaires as head of Ynna Holding, a company specialising in real estate development, hotels, retail and industry.

Perfect Knowledge is a private company that offers a private fixer service to VIP’s, senior executives and ultra high net worth individuals (UHNWI). We provide a discreet service that manages private and personal affairs on behalf of our clients. Our focus is to ensure total privacy for the individual or organisation at all times. Our services are aimed at private banks, offshore trusts, celebrities, royal family management, private families and discerning individuals where money is no object and discretion is paramount.

www.perfect-knowledge.com

July 8th, 2012 by admin | Comments Off

Lifestyle Fixers

Lifestyle Fixers

Concierge services are booming

Ever wanted to have dinner with the Dalai Lama? Easy. Or a romantic meal on an iceberg? Simple. Want to know where to get your hands on a real-life camel for an Arabian-themed party? No problem. If you’ve got the cash, and it’s legal, there’s a whole industry ready and willing to satisfy your every whim. Despite financial turmoil, business is booming for the people known as “lifestyle fixers”.

The highest-profiling business in the sector is Quintessentially. Co-founded by the Duchess of Cornwall’s nephew Ben Elliot in 2000, it is now firmly established, with offices in more than 60 cities around the world.

“Quintessentially can offer access to the inaccessible and make the seemingly impossible, possible,” says spokesman Alex Pakenham, who adds that despite ongoing economic woes the service is increasingly in demand. “Sales rates have continued to climb, and our renewal rates are stronger than ever,” he says.

Of Quintessentially’s three founders, one worked in the film industry, another was a well-connected entrepreneur and a third brought an exceptional legal background to the mix. They saw the need for a “proactive and personalised” concierge service, being delivered to those wanting the best in life but without the time or the contacts to achieve it. Quintessentially’s more famous members include Jemima Khan, Sophie Dahl, Sir Tom Hunter, Madonna, Gwyneth Paltrow and various members of Coldplay.

The first tier of membership costs £1,000 (€1,148) a year, while the most exclusive Elite membership costs up to £24,000 a year, and includes your own team of dedicated personal account managers in multiple cities around the world. While potential “elites” might be referred by existing members, the final decision over whether to take them on comes from the three founders, depending on “the compatibility of the potential member with the brand, their net worth, their location, and whether they would add value to the membership base”, says Pakenham.

Quintessentially has also launched 32 luxury sister businesses focused on property, travel, luxury retail, wine, art, flowers and private aviation, to name but a few. For example, through Quintessentially Music, you can book a performer for your own event, or get backstage meet and greet opportunities with your favourite artist.

Of course, there have been some particularly elaborate requests. One member asked the company to recreate Batman’s Batcave in his house, and then there was the time when it was asked to source a pet jelly fish. It was also Quintessentially who organised the Dalai Lama date and the dinner a deux on the iceberg. One member called the company from the Amazon, saying he couldn’t find any of the area’s rare pink dolphins despite having a guide with him, and a helicopter was duly sent to take him to where they were.

For many people with the spare capital, being a member of a concierge service is seen as a necessity to make their lives run more smoothly, whether they’re in need of a last-minute babysitter or tickets for the most sought-after seats at the best sports events.

Concetto Marletta, head of client relations at the Dorchester hotel in London, is also founder of Totally Indispensable, an exclusive private members’ concierge service. While he deals with everyday requests in the Dorchester, as a private concierge his tasks may include, for example, getting someone into a fully booked hotel – Cocoa Island in the Maldives, over Christmas. However, sometimes he is forced to decline his clients’ requests; for instance, when asked to source two white tiger cubs – research showed they are an endangered species, and it’s illegal to trade them.

Alongside private concierges and “fixing” services, some high-end retailers are jumping on the bandwagon by offering a concierge service to their customers that will tie in with their luxury image. For example, while Harrods has a personal shopping service, By Appointment, it also offers By Appointment Beyond, which arranges “unique experiences” for clients.

These range from tickets to glamorous film launches in London’s West End, Broadway productions in New York, or, perhaps, a St Petersburg ballet or Argentinian polo match. It can also arrange the “party of a lifetime”, whether that’s an opulent English garden party on a private estate or a ladies lunch at home. “No idea is too big, too small, too mad or too much trouble,” claims the company. Perhaps you fancy a trip to one of the most secluded and untouched locations on Earth? This could be, say, a private island, or jungle – stopping off at a five-star igloo on the way.

Luxury phone company Vertu offers three levels of concierge service to its customers, with the basic level free for the first year and £1,850 afterwards. Such a service is, for many, part of the appeal of having a Vertu phone, and what sets them apart. With the top level of membership, customers have a dedicated concierge who takes all their calls, but even with the entry-level Classic Vertu service, a customer’s preferences are visible on screen to whoever is dealing with them. This has proved handy for its customers. One Vertu client and his family were in an airport departure lounge when they heard that the hotel they were flying to had cancelled their booking. By the time they landed, Vertu had found another hotel and a car to take them there.

However, while most of a concierge service’s day-to-day calls revolve around booking restaurants, theatre tickets, or finding the right place to take business clients for dinner in a foreign city, it is the quirky requests that stand out. Ten Group, for example, has hired an elephant for a wedding for £10,000. Other examples it gives include the member who bought a designer glass bathtub that couldn’t be manoeuvred up the spiral staircase in his Grade II listed house; Ten Group arranged for the street below to close while a crane was brought in to lift the bath through a window.

Another member became stuck in sand while driving through the desert in the United Arab Emirates. He didn’t know his location, but using Google Earth, Ten Group found the road and “large mosque” the member remembered seeing en route; finally, using his rough location they informed the UAE’s breakdown service to rescue him. On the appeal of Ten Group’s services, Alex Cheatle, chief executive, says: “In an age when anyone can source information online, it’s all about maintaining personal contacts to gain access to things that are not on offer to the general public such as advance tasting menus at top restaurants, access to VIP areas, and complimentary upgrades on flights and in hotels.”

David Thomas runs Marleymanor, another service which he says handles a range of “highly confidential and sensitive assignments for individuals and corporate clients”. To help him in his role, he draws on over nine years of experience in the SAS Reserve Regiment, saying that this training has prepared him for the most “intense and challenging assignments”.

After leaving the service to provide close protection to the Kuwaiti Ambassador in the run-up to the first Gulf War, David established Marleymanor in 1993. Initially, the company specialised in providing close protection and surveillance for blue-chip clients. However, Thomas says: “When I was dealing with issues for people from an investigative point of view I found they also wanted somebody to arrange, for instance, a chauffeur, which perhaps has no link or association to them as a discreet service – or to find a diamond for a mistress.”

More and more clients were seeking a concierge service as a bolt-on option. “A lot of wealthy people who do not have the time or don’t want to make effort to ring lots of people to arrange, say, a concert, or other event, or they might have an issue to solve in terms of a fraud – they can turn to us for help.”

At any one time, he adds, Marleymanor might be dealing with two or three client requests, and they have 20 to 30 clients on their books. Fees are charged on a case-by-case basis, but are usually 10 to 15% of the overall cost of the case, or a daily management fee of £750 to £1,250 plus expenses, depending on location and duration. The Marleymanor website gives a range of example cases, including the client who asked Marleymanor to source an iPhone for their female friend, with absolute discretion assured.

But this was no ordinary iPhone; it was to incorporate a solid gold casing with the main external controls formed from cut diamonds. A jeweller was sourced in London’s Hatton Garden, before Marleymanor hand delivered the bespoke iPhone to the client in Dubai.

Ifzaal Khan  runs Perfect Knowledge, a private fixer for the secretly wealthy, carrying out tasks from delivering two antiques clocks worth more than £330,000 each to a palace belonging to a Middle Eastern royal family member, to sourcing medical treatment for a child who had only 24 hours to live. “We managed to get the medicine to the client’s child, even though it wasn’t available in the country they were in. This was done through contacting the sheikh there, and asking him to instruct his royal family office to source the medicine,” says Khan. “A private jet was sent to pick up the medicine, and it was delivered to the child – so you see it’s a serious business.”

Most of Perfect Knowledge’s clients have been referred through another client. “This means our network of contacts between all our clients is very strong,” says Khan. He adds that the company can deal with cases in most countries through its client network, and works on behalf of a number of Middle Eastern royal family members as well as private family offices, private banks and trusts.

Khan says: “The financial crisis has changed the environment as our private clients are becoming more discreet about their financial status thus using our confidential services more often.” Khan is all about building relationships. www.perfect-knowledge.com email:-  info@perfect-knowledge.com

Article | By Harriet Meyer

December 5th, 2011 by admin | Comments Off

World’s most expensive car number plates

World’s most expensive car number plates

The list is compiled by Regtransfers website, UK’s largest independent dealer in personalised number plates

Abu Dhabi dominates a global list of the most expensive car number plates ever sold.

Buyers from the UAE capital account for 37 of the top 50 most expensive plates ever sold. The 37 Abu Dhabi buyers listed in the rankings collectively spent AED222.9m ($60.6m), or an average of AED6 ($1.6m) for their car plates.

Here is the countdown to the top 20 plates ever sold.

Buyer: Abu Dhabi

Cost: AED3.2m ($871,174m)

Plate: 33

Buyer: Hong Kong

Cost: HKD7m ($900,977)

Plate: 19

Buyer: Abu Dhabi

Cost: AED3.35m ($912,010)

Bought: September 2010

Plate: 66

Buyer: Abu Dhabi

Cost: AED3.35m ($912,010)

Plate: 42

Buyer: Abu Dhabi

Cost: AED2.4m ($925,622)

Bought: June 2009

Plate: 88

Buyer: Abu Dhabi

Cost: AED4.2m ($1,143,416)

Plate: 2

Buyer: Hong Kong

Cost: HKD9.5m ($1,222,754)

Plate: 10

Buyer: Abu Dhabi

Cost: AED4.5m ($1,225,089)

Plate: 45

Buyer: Abu Dhabi

Cost: AED5m ($1,361,210)

Plate: 16

Buyer: Abu Dhabi

Cost: AED6m ($1,633,452)

Plate: 9

Buyer: Hong Kong

Cost: HKD13m ($1,673,243)

Bought: June 1994

Plate: 99

Buyer: Abu Dhabi

Cost: AED6.5m ($1,769,573)

Plate: 55

Buyer: Abu Dhabi

Cost: AED6.5m ($1,769,573)

Plate: 18

Buyer: Hong Kong

Cost: HKD16m ($2,059,376)

Bought: February 2008

Plate: 11

Buyer: Abu Dhabi

Cost: AED8m ($2,177,936)

Plate: 12

Buyer: Abu Dhabi

Cost: AED8.9m ($2,422,953)

Plate: 9

Buyer: Abu Dhabi

Cost: AED10m ($2,722,420)

Bought: September 2010

Plate: 7

Buyer: Abu Dhabi

Cost: AED16.5m ($4,491,993)

Bought: February 2010

Plate: 5

Buyer: Abu Dhabi

Cost: AED25.2m ($6,860,498)

Plate: 1

Buyer: Abu Dhabi

Cost: AED52.2m ($14,211,032)

Bought: February 2008

Perfect Knowledge is a private company that offers a private fixer service to VIP’s, senior executives and ultra high net worth individuals (UHNWI). We provide a discreet service that manages private and personal affairs on behalf of our clients. Our focus is to ensure total privacy for the individual or organisation at all times. Our services are aimed at private banks, offshore trusts, celebrities, royal family management, private families and discerning individuals where money is no object and discretion is paramount.

www.perfect-knowledge.com

December 13th, 2010 by admin | Comments Off

World’s most expensive row of houses goes on sale with a total value of £400m

World’s most expensive row of houses goes on sale with a total value of £400m

The world’s most expensive row of terraced houses has gone on sale for a staggering collective price of £400million. Cornwall Terrace, in London’s Regent’s Park, consists of eight double-fronted mansions, each with a value of between £29 and £60million. Estate agents have described the street as: ‘A rare convergence of provenance, history and grandeur.’

Street value: One of the vast mansions on Cornwall Terrace in London's Regent's Park, where every property is for sale with a collective value of £400m

Street value: One of the vast mansions on Cornwall Terrace in London’s Regent’s Park, where every property is for sale with a collective value of £400m. The row of properties was designed by architect Sir John Nash as part of the Prince Regent’s – later King George IV – plans for the 19th century masterpiece Regent’s Park. Overlooking the park’s rowing lake, the mansions belonged to the British nobility for 150 years before becoming the headquarters for British Land. The whole terrace was then purchased by developers Oakmayne two-and-a-half years ago.

The company employed a group of renowned interior designers, supervised by English Heritage and The Crown Estate, to give the properties a tasteful makeover. Each Grade 1-listed mansion took 83,000 man-hours to renovate, with a whole year spent digging beneath the original basement to create two extra floors. The properties have 8,000 to 14,000 square feet each, and five to seven bedrooms. The interiors make the most of the buildings’ rich architectural heritage, while boasting state-of-the-art technology.

Tasteful makeover: A group of renowned interior designers, supervised by English Heritage and The Crown Estate, renovated the properties

Tasteful makeover: A group of renowned interior designers, supervised by English Heritage and The Crown Estate, renovated the properties. Each master bedroom alone is the size of the average London apartment, while entrance halls are described by agents as being of ‘embassy proportions.’ All properties boast a silent hydraulic elevator and multi-room iPad-controllable audiovisual and lighting systems.

Each even comes with an accompanying two-bedroom mews house for staff, and a ‘Bentley-sized garage’, as well as a spa and gym. The largest property, to be sold next year, also has its own ballroom and swimming pool complex. The first two properties have been put on the market for £29 and £39million. The remaining six properties will be marketed next year with one unidentified mansion expected to cost £60 million.

Prospective buyers have already made enquiries into the possibility of purchasing two properties and converting them into a single home.

Source: Daily Mail

Perfect Knowledge is a private company that offers a private fixer service to VIP’s, senior executives and ultra high net worth individuals (UHNWI). We provide a discreet service that manages private and personal affairs on behalf of our clients. Our focus is to ensure total privacy for the individual or organisation at all times. Our services are aimed at private banks, offshore trusts, celebrities, royal family management, private families and discerning individuals where money is no object and discretion is paramount.

www.perfect-knowledge.com

November 26th, 2010 by admin | Comments Off

The World’s 20 richest people

The top 10 richest people in the world have a combined worth of 342 billion dollars in 2010, up from 254 billion a year ago. Here are the 20 wealthiest, as announced Wednesday by Forbes magazine in its annual list of the world’s billionaires:

1. Carlos Slim Helu and family. Mexico. Telecoms. 53.5 billion dollars.

2. Bill Gates. US. Microsoft. 53 billion dollars.

3. Warren Buffett. US. Berkshire Hathaway. 47 billion dollars.

4. Mukesh Ambani. India. Oil, gas. 29 billion dollars.

5. Lakshmi Mittal. India. Steel. 28.7 billion dollars.

6. Lawrence Ellison. US. Oracle. 28 billion dollars.

7. Bernard Arnault. France. LVMH luxury goods. 27.5 billion dollars.

8. Eike Batista. Brazil. Mining, oil. 27 billion dollars.

9. Amancio Ortega. Spain. Clothing retail. 25 billion dollars.

10. Karl Albrecht. Germany. Supermarkets. 23.5 billion dollars.

11. Ingvar Kamprad and family. Sweden. Ikea. 23 billion dollars.

12. Christy Walton and family. US. Walmart. 22.5 billion dollars.

13. Stefan Persson. Sweden. Hennes and Mauritz. 22.4 billion dollars.

14. Li Ka-shing. Hong Kong. Diversified. 21 billion dollars.

15. Jim Walton. US. Walmart. 20.7 billion dollars.

16. Alice Walton. US. Walmart. 20.6 billion dollars.

17. Liliane Bettencourt. France. L’Oreal. 20 billion dollars.

18. S. Robson Walton. Walmart. 19.8 billion dollars.

19. Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Alsaud. Saudi Arabia. Investments. 19.4 billion dollars.

20. David Thomson and family. Canada. Inheritance. 19 billion dollars.

Perfect Knowledge is a private company that offers a private fixer service to VIP’s, senior executives and ultra high net worth individuals (UHNWI). We provide a discreet service that manages private and personal affairs on behalf of our clients. Our focus is to ensure total privacy for the individual or organisation at all times. Our services are aimed at private banks, offshore trusts, celebrities, royal family management, private families and discerning individuals where money is no object and discretion is paramount.

www.perfect-knowledge.com

November 25th, 2010 by admin | Comments Off

In search for the private fixer delivering ultra luxury to the wealthy elite

For the super-rich, those for whom the financial industry has coined the acronym UHNWI (ultra-high-net-worth individuals). the goalposts in the world of Luxury are forever moving. Where once you could rest assured that access to the finest goods was the prerogative of the privileged few, thanks to rising wealth and fractional ownership schemes, even private jets and super yachts have been placed within the affordability bracket of many a healthy bank balance.

For the wealthy elite it has meant that the pursuit of exclusivity has become the kingpin of luxury and obtaining the unattainable has become the ultimate prize. Thankfully, a plethora of modern-day miracle workers are on hand and teams of advisers and private fixers for whom catering to the whims and desires of the ubber rich has become a full—time role.

THE PRIVATE FIXER

The hotel concierge has, and always will he, the keeper of an infinite number of contacts able to secure a table in London’s most difficult to book restaurants or deliver money-can’t-buy experiences. But this style of personal service is extending well beyond the confines of the concierge desk, spawning a generation of lifestyle managers keen to facilitate the seemingly impossible for those with money to burn.

Ifzaal Khan is one such entrepreneur a private fixer who caters to the demands of international high society, working either privately or publicly on their behalf. “We represent an elite range of clients, including foreign rulers, billionaires, royalty, ultra-high-net-worth individuals, trusts and private families,” reveals Khan. ‘We are fully committed to protecting the privacy of our clients and their families at all times and our services are based on complete trust and discretion,” he adds. Indeed, such is the confidential nature of Khan’s role, that even those working for his company, Perfect Knowledge, only know the highest profile clients by a pin code.

Khan can act as a client’s agent or broker in any situation, and with contacts in establishments and companies around the world, he is able to facilitate whatever a client’s brief demands — be that finding a £20 million property or selling a Picasso. Our services include representing a family’s private interests, the growth and confidentiality of their personal life, seeking solutions to problems, as well as obtaining expert guidance and acting as a private third party.” Perhaps one of the most interesting services available at Perfect Knowledge is the personal courtier and private family office.

As a private courtier, Khan’s private fixers act as trusted advisors, Royal Family Management, guardians and chaperones on a short or long-term basis to international clients visiting the UK. The personal courier service meanwhile ensures the safe transit and hand-delivery of sensitive documents or very expensive pieces of jewellery, wherever the client is in the world. For the privileged, total peace of mind is guaranteed.

“I once had a request from a Qatari prince who wanted me to take two antiques clocks he had just bought from Harrods to his palace in Qatar The two clocks cost £350,000 each and money was no object in ensuring I could take them to Qatar for him that day, (Tel: ++44 (0) 207 471 4885) www.perfect-knowledge.com or info@perfect-knowledge.com.

For press inquires please  email James Marsh on pr@perfectknowledgepr.com

September 15th, 2010 by admin | Comments Off

The most expensive flat in history british brothers sell Monaco penthouse La Belle Epogue for a cool £200 million pounds

The most expensive three bedroom flat in history has been sold for almost £200m – despite a dark history involving a murder in its main reception room. Reclusive British property developers Christian and Nick Candy are thought to have made a profit of at least £190m from La Belle Epoque penthouse in Monaco, on the French Riviera. They bought the 17,500 sq ft flat from Englishwoman Lily Safra in the early 2000s, soon after her banker husband Edmond infamously died in a mysterious fire inside the property.

Billionaire standard: The vast roof terraces come complete with mature 15 foot trees and infinity pool

Billionaire standard: The vast roof terraces come complete with mature 15 foot trees and infinity pool

Unrivaled: The views across Monte Carlo's marina and the sea beyond are breathtaking

Unrivaled: The views across Monte Carlo’s marina and the sea beyond are breathtaking

Fit for a prince: Despite the staggering price, the property is thought to have been snapped up by a wealthy Arab sheik

Fit for a prince: Despite the staggering price, the property is thought to have been snapped up by a wealthy Arab sheik.  The British Candy brothers bought the flat from Lily Safra in the early 2000s, soon after her husband Edmond died in a mysterious fire inside the property. It cost a mere £10million. It has now been snapped up on a 97 year lease at an asking price of €240 million (£199m) by an unnamed Middle Eastern investor, thought to be an Arab sheik. Early theories back in 1999 were that Mr Safra had been killed by Russians in retaliation for supporting an FBI clampdown on money laundering in the Mediterranean principality. But then Ted Maher, a former American Green Beret medical auxiliary who was caring for the ageing Mr Safra, suddenly confessed to starting the fire, which also killed another nurse.

Despite a double murder charge, Maher spent just five years in prison – increasing speculation that he was a ‘patsy’ set up to take responsibility for the crime by powerful interests who were really responsible. Whatever the truth, it enabled Christian Candy, 36, and his brother Nick, 37, to make a fortune out of the then blighted flat. Mrs Safra, who inherited her husband’s £3bn fortune thanks to him cutting his two brothers out of his will two months before his death, was happy to offload it for less than £10m. In an interview last year Christian Candy admitted he had spent some £26m doing the flat up, turning it into one of the most desirable properties in the world. With unspoiled views across Monte Carlo’s marina and the sea beyond, the two floor penthouse includes a double height library and vast roof terraces complete with mature 15 foot trees and infinity pool.

La Belle Epoque, Monaco – Price: £199m +

Terms: Leasehold 97 years
Condition: recently refurbished to billionaire standards
Description: Two-floor penthouse in six-storey building overlooking Monte Carlo marina. Well placed for local restaurants and world famous casino. With lift
Bedrooms: Three, all ensuite with walk-in wardrobes and dressing rooms
Features: Double-height library and office, aquarium, revolving wardrobes, sliding paintings and TV screens
Outside space: Circular roof terrace complete with mature plants and trees
Leisure facilities: Spa, gym, cinema, media room, pools
Security: To oligarch standard
Underground car parking available

There is a leisure room complete with billiard tables and arcade video games, Jacuzzi and spa, and even a media room which includes executive chairs which convert into beds in case of over-work. Other James Bond touches include old master paintings and cinema screens which emerge from walls at the touch of a button, and numerous walk-in wardrobes and dressing rooms. Security is also state-of-the art, with a panic room, reinforced glass, and surveillance cameras everywhere.

The Candys, who were brought up in Surrey and started their career borrowing £6000 to do up their grandmother’s house in Earl’s Court, are believed to now be living between another of their Monaco flats and Candyscape II, their multi-million pound yacht. The area where they live is one of the most expensive in France. In 2008, Russian billionaire Mikhail Prokhorov was poised to spend more than £450m buying the nearby Villa Leopolda. Mrs Safra was again the seller, but the deal fell through.

Luxurious: Christian Candy admitted he had spent some £26m doing the flat up, turning it into one of the most desirable properties in the world

Luxurious: Christian Candy admitted he had spent some £26m doing the flat up, turning it into one of the most desirable properties in the world

Mysterious past: Early theories back in 1999 were that Mr Safra had been killed by Russians in retaliation for supporting an FBI clampdown on money laundering in the Mediterranean principality

Mysterious past: Early theories back in 1999 were that Mr Safra had been killed by Russians in retaliation for supporting an FBI clampdown on money laundering in the Mediterranean principality. No expense spared: The property includes includes a double height library, billiard tables, arcade video games, Jacuzzi and spa, and even a media room

And so to bed: Now the Candy's have moved out for their buyer, they are believed to be living between another of their Monaco flats and Candyscape II, their multi-million pound yacht

Perfect Knowledge is a private company that offers a private fixer service to VIP’s, senior executives and ultra high net worth individuals (UHNWI). We provide a discreet service that manages private and personal affairs on behalf of our clients. Our focus is to ensure total privacy for the individual or organisation at all times. Our services are aimed at private banks, offshore trusts, celebrities, royal family management, private families and discerning individuals where money is no object and discretion is paramount.

www.perfect-knowledge.com

September 14th, 2010 by admin | Comments Off

Ten Most Expensive Divorces

1. Rupert and Anna Murdoch – $1.7 billion

Rupert married Anna in the 1960s, with the pair remaining together for 32 years, having three children. They split amicably in 1998. The divorce was finalised in June 1999 when he agreed to let her leave with $1.7 billion. 17 days later he married Wendi Deng.

2. Adnan and Soraya Khashoggi – $874 million

Saudi businessman Adnan made his money as an international arms dealer. He then launched his company Triad, based in Switzerland, owning banks hotels and real estate across the world. He married Soraya in 1961. Their 1982 divorce resulted in an estimated $874 million settlement.

3. Craig and Wendy McCaw - $460 million

Craig made his money turning a failing TV cable service into a successful business, eventually selling for $755 million. In 1981 he then acquired cellular phone licenses, eventually selling to phone company AT&T for approximately $12 billion, becoming its largest single shareholder.

The pair met at Stanford University when she tutored him, with them marrying in 1974. In 1995 divorce proceedings were initiated with Wendy wanting her share to support a $200,000 a month lifestyle.

4. Roman and Irina Abramovich - $300 million

It had been speculated that the settlement could have left her the world’s richest ever divorcee. But according to Russian news sources, Mrs Abramovich settled for $300m (£155m).

The figure included the value of homes in Britain and Moscow, as well as a yacht and private plane. At one point it was thought he would have to pay a settlement of at least $1 billion.

5. Michael and Maya Polsky - $184 million

According to court records, the couple married in the Ukraine in 1975, coming to the US in 1976 with “only four suitcases and $500 in cash.

After sighting irreconcilable difference in 2003, Maya Polsky filed for divorce from energy magnate Michael Polsky. In October 2006 a Chicago judge said Mrs Polsky was entitled to at least half of the couple’s assets.

6. John ‘Jack’ Welch and Jane Beasley - $180 million

Welch is the former Chairman and CEO of General Electric, the technology and service conglomerate in New York, now ranked as the world’s largest company.

The couple married in April 1989, divorcing in 2003. While Welch had reportedly written a prenuptial agreement, there was a 10-year time limit. Beasley reportedly left with amount to be in the range of $180 million.

7. Michael and Juanita Jordan - $168million

The most expensive celebrity divorce in history. The former Chicago Bulls basketball superstar married Juanita Vanoy in 1989. They divorced in 2007. It is thought negotiations between the couple added £20 million to the final deal from an initial settlement.

The marriage had shown signs of trouble in the past with Juanita filing for divorce in 2002, although they announced a reconciliation.

8. Neil Diamond and Marcia Murphey - $150 million

When Diamond met Marcia Murphey, he was already married to his first wife. In 1994, they separated, she citing “irreconcilable difference”. The singer claims he willingly gave her the money.

9. Steven Spielberg and Amy Irving – $100 million

Amy Irving shot to fame in 1976 when she played the lone teen survivor in Carrie. Spielberg began to make a name for himself in Hollywood, following Jaws. The pair married in 1985, but the pair broke up four years later. He gave Irving, the mother of their son Max $100 million.

10. John and Beverly Charman - $95 million

The pair met in 1969 at school. When they married in 1976 neither had significant resources. In November 2003, Mr Charman, nicknamed “King of the London Insurance Market”, told his wife he was setting up residence in Bermuda and their marriage was over.

He initially offered her £6 million cash, but she argued that the sum was not enough. The judge decreed a fair settlement would involve him giving 37 per cent of his assets. Mr Charman had a subsequent appeal dismissed. It is thought to be Britain’s highest divorce settlement.

Perfect Knowledge is a private company that offers a private fixer service to VIP’s, senior executives and ultra high net worth individuals (UHNWI). We provide a discreet service that manages private and personal affairs on behalf of our clients. Our focus is to ensure total privacy for the individual or organisation at all times. Our services are aimed at private banks, offshore trusts, celebrities, royal family management, private families and discerning individuals where money is no object and discretion is paramount.

www.perfect-knowledge.com

August 25th, 2010 by admin | Comments Off

Mega Hotel complex opens in the Muslim holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia.

abraj al bait complex 468x322 Raffles hotel opens in Mecca

Luxury hotel chain Raffles - one of the Singapore’s top hotel and resort chain – has opened its seventh property in the Muslim holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia. The 213-room hotel is Raffles’ second property in the Middle East, following the opening of its Dubai property in 2007. Looking over the Grand Mosque and the Kaaba, the Raffles Makkah Palace offers round-the-clock butler service for guests, along with a “coffee sommelier,” a four-storey mall in the basement, and four restaurants.

Dining options include the Creamery ice cream parlor, the Narjes tea salon, Middle Eastern restaurant Al Majilis and a fusion restaurant named Al Qasr. However, Raffles’ hotel will soon be overshadowed — literally — by the Makkah Clock Royal Tower hotel from Fairmont right next door. Situated in a 76-storey building and set to be opened within months, the 858-room hotel has been built inside the new Makkah Clock Tower, the centerpiece of the enormous Abraj Al Bait Complex which will eventually house the Raffles, the Fairmont and a Swissotel.

The clock tower features four faces that are 43 meters in diameter, visible from 17 kilometers away, to announce daily prayers to the Muslim world and establish “Makkah Time” as an alternative to Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) as the global time standard. According to hotel analysts STR Global, Saudi Arabia was the second fastest-growing market in the Middle East after the United Arab Emirates in June, with 16,680 rooms in the pipeline, compared to 54,814 in the UAE. Last week, Hilton announced that it had signed a deal to open two properties in Riyadh in 2012, describing the country as its “number one development market in the Middle East.”

Source: Luxxo

fairmont hotel saudi arabia 468x310 Raffles hotel opens in Mecca

Perfect Knowledge is a private company that offers a private fixer service to VIP’s, senior executives and ultra high net worth individuals (UHNWI). We provide a discreet service that manages private and personal affairs on behalf of our clients. Our focus is to ensure total privacy for the individual or organisation at all times. Our services are aimed at private banks, offshore trusts, celebrities, royal family management, private families and discerning individuals where money is no object and discretion is paramount.

www.perfect-knowledge.com

August 18th, 2010 by admin | Comments Off

Billionaires Row: Top 10 most expensive streets in the world

Monaco

Avenue Princesse Grace is the most expensive street in the world to buy property, where $120,000 (€84,985) will purchase just one square metre of prime real estate, according to a survey by Wealth Bulletin. Prime residential property on the top 10 most expensive streets in the world saw their overall value fall by 12% in the last year, the survey found, with European streets faring better than their US and emerging markets counterparts. That compares with price falls of between 20% to 30% in mainstream property prices in London and New York over the same period.

Avenue Princesse Grace might have been the most expensive street on the list, but prices for prime property there have fallen from a staggeringly high $190,000 per sq/m a year ago. Via Suvretta in the Swiss ski resort of St Moritz was the only street on the list that saw prices rise for top properties in the last year. The street ranked sixth on the list, where property costs at least $45,000 per sq/m, an 18% rise on the 2008 price.

The second most expensive street was Chemin de Saint-Hospice on Cap Ferrat in the south of France, where prime property sells for $100,000 per sq/m. Ostozhenka in Moscow, at $35,000 per sq/m, was the only street from an emerging market on this year’s list.

The addresses that are streets ahead

Avenue Princesse Grace, Monaco, $120,000 per sq/m

Still the most expensive street in the world, expect to pay at least $120,000 per sq/m on the iconic Avenue Princesse Grace for a modest apartment with one of the most spectacular views in the world. But that looks like a bargain from a year ago, when top end residential properties on the street were $190,000 per sq/m.

A 334 sq/m four-bedroom penthouse on Avenue Princesse Grace is on the market at $50m around $149,000 per sq/m – not including a 220 sq/m terrace. Local agents reckon asking prices are being discounted by as much as 20% and the above property will probably sell for closer to $40m. Monaco-based independent agent Pieter van Naeltwijck said transactions had fallen 25% since last year. But he said super-rich Russians were beginning to come back into the market, fuelling renewed demand.

• Chemin de Saint-Hospice, Cap Ferrat, South of France, $100,000 per sq/m

Less than 30 miles down the road from Avenue Princesse Grace, Chemin de Saint-Hospice is the second most expensive street in the world, where the top properties sell for $100,000 per sq/m. Chemin de Saint-Hospice snakes through Cap Ferrat with its 15 houses commanding beautiful Mediterranean views. Local estate agents say there is one property for sale on Chemin de Saint Hospice, but it is being sold privately and its price a closely guarded secret.

• Fifth Avenue, New York, $72,000 per sq/m

Fifth Avenue, New York City, has the most iconic status of all the streets on the list and retains third place this year. But prices on the best parts of Fifth Avenue have come off the boil in the past 12 months. A 400 sq/m apartment with terraces overlooking Central Park on the Upper East Side of Fifth Avenue sold for $29m in June. Local estate agents say the market has been affected by the lack of supply, with residents reluctant to sell because of perceived price discounts.

• Kensington Palace Gardens, London, $65,000 per sq/m

Kensington Palace Gardens, the private road that abuts Kensington Palace and houses several embassies, including the Russian delegation, is still the fourth most expensive street in the world. Prices on KPG, as estate agents call it, have come off no more than 15% to 20%. Two properties have been sold privately on KPG this year, according to estate agent Savills, which indicates demand is still strong for London’s most exclusive address.

• Avenue Montaigne, Paris, $54,000 per sq/m

Avenue Montaigne in the 8th arrondisement – which includes the Élysée Palace, official residence of President Nicolas Sarkozy, maintains its fifth place on Wealth Bulletin’s list, proving the eternal allure of Paris among the world’s wealthiest. Estate agents say there have been little changes in the prices paid for top properties on the street in the last year. The strong euro also makes the dollar prices for residential property in the city higher than they have been for some time. Avenue Montaigne is part of the city’s Golden Triangle, which includes the Avenue Champs-Elysees and Avenue Georges V.

• Via Suvretta, St Moritz, Switzerland, $45,000 per sq/m

The winding Via Suvretta in the exclusive ski resort of St Mortiz gets promoted to sixth place in this year’s survey and is the only street that saw prices rise by 18%. Expect to pay at least $45,000 per sq/m for a top-end property on Via Suvretta. Local agents reckon the rising prices are due to buoyant demand from the super wealthy looking to relocate to Switzerland, especially from countries, like the UK, where governments are increasing tax rates for the wealthy. Residential prices in the top neighbourhoods of Geneva and Zurich are also experiencing a mini price boom. The strong Swiss franc is also inflating dollar prices for property in Switzerland.

• Via Romazzino, Porto Cervo, Sardinia,$42,000 per sq/m

Via Romazzino makes this year’s list for the first time. Top prices on Italy’s most expensive street, in the exclusive resort of Porto Cervo, are at least $42,000 per sq/m. Holiday homes of many of Italy’s wealthiest individuals are located on the Via Romazzino, which is also popular with Russian billionaires. Alisher Usmanov, the Russian oligarch and owner of Arsenal football club, likes the street so much that he’s allegedly bought eight houses located on it, or near to it.

• Severn Road, The Peak, Hong Kong, $40,000 per sq/m

The Hong Kong residential property market is among the most volatile in the world – just how volatile was illustrated by the big falls in top-end property prices in the past year. Number two on last year’s list, with prices of $121,000 per sq/m, Severn Road has plummeted to $40,000 per sq/m. Local estate agents say the global recession has hit Hong Kong property hard and demand to top properties has fallen sharply since October last year.

• Ostozhenka Street, Moscow, $35,000 per sq/m

Ostozhenka Street falls to ninth position in this year’s survey, down from sixth place last year. Local estate agents say top properties on the street will achieve at least $35,000 a sq/m, but that’s down by around $5,000 from last year. Many of Russia’s wealthiest people have apartments on Ostozhenka, which makes up part of the city’s so-called Golden Mile.

• Wolseley Road, Point Piper, Australia, $28,000 per sq/m

Properties on Wolseley Road have maintained their value, due to the robustness of the Australian economy and the strength of the local currency. Local agents believe prices for the best properties remain high, but say the market has been affected by the lack of supply. Apart from last year’s sale of Craig-y-Mor, a non-waterfront house, for $32.4m, making it Australia’s most expensive residential property at the time, there have few sales of note on the street.

Perfect Knowledge is a private company that offers a private fixer service to VIP’s, senior executives and ultra high net worth individuals (UHNWI). We provide a discreet service that manages private and personal affairs on behalf of our clients. Our focus is to ensure total privacy for the individual or organisation at all times. Our services are aimed at private banks, offshore trusts, celebrities, royal family management, private families and discerning individuals where money is no object and discretion is paramount.

www.perfect-knowledge.com

August 12th, 2010 by admin | Comments Off

How super rich live in China

cartier china 468x311 How super rich live in China

A new report has revealed that Beijing has the maximum number of rich people in China. The latest Hurun Report on China’s wealthiest people said that there are 143,000 (yuan-)multimillionaires and 8,800 billionaires in Beijing. In Shanghai, there are 116,000 multimillionaires and 7,000 billionaires, reports the China Daily. The report also sheds light on how  the super-rich in Beijing want to live their lives. A wealthy Beijing resident for example would have to spend at least RMB87 million on property, cars and other luxury goods to get into the report’s good books.

They have at least three dwellings of their own, including a villa, like the 400-sq-m Ziyu Shanzhuang villa costing 24 million yuan, a luxury apartment in the downtown area for work purposes, and a Siheyuan courtyard house probably in Houhai. In terms of brands, the Hurun Report notes that Beijing’s rich prefer Cartier to Louis Vuitton.

china cartier louis vuitton 468x337 How super rich live in China

“During the past several years, the complexion of the rich in China has changed in many aspects. Many of them say they want to be a sort of upper class, rather than only being rich,” said Rupert Hoogewerf, founder and publisher of the Hurun Report. The Hurun Report also defined the upper class in five other cities: Shanghai, Hangzhou, Shenzhen, Chengdu and Shenyang. China has 825,000 individuals worth more than 10 million yuan and 51,000 individuals with more than 100 million yuan, according to the report. 1 Chinese yuan (RMB) = 0.146 U.S. dollars

rolls royce hong kong 468x350 How super rich live in China

Perfect Knowledge is a private company that offers a private fixer service to VIP’s, senior executives and ultra high net worth individuals (UHNWI). We provide a discreet service that manages private and personal affairs on behalf of our clients. Our focus is to ensure total privacy for the individual or organisation at all times. Our services are aimed at private banks, offshore trusts, celebrities, royal family management, private families and discerning individuals where money is no object and discretion is paramount.

www.perfect-knowledge.com

August 12th, 2010 by admin | No Comments »

THE SECRET AGENT FOR FOREIGN BILLIONAIRES

As Simon Cowell was turned away from the door by a 30-strong phalanx of bouncers, while his former girlfriend and protegee, the bejewelled Sinitta, was waved through into a vast foyer filled with dry ice, it became clear that this was no ordinary house party. But then, the venue was no ordinary house. It was 46A The Bishops Avenue, otherwise known as Royal Mansion. The party, two years ago, was to celebrate the sale of what was the most expensive new-build house in Britain when if changed hands for a reported £50 million to a mysterious businesswoman from Kazakhstan. There’s a helipad, a gilded mosaic indoor pool, and what isn’t gold is marble, including a Turkish bath in the basement.

The host of this champagne-fuelled bacchanal was Trevor Abrahmsohn, 55, managing director of Glentree Estates, a smooth-talking networker renowned as the billionaires’ estate agent, who brokered the sale. His guest of honour was Mikhail Gorbachev (they both support 31 leukaemia charities and have lost family to the disease). Speaking through an interpreter, Gorbachev delivered a moving speech but concluded: ‘Many Russians bring their money to your country. Be careful, they might buy everything!’ This was January 2008, when financial markets were showing signs of instability and house prices started to tumble. Yet the party-goers were still buying. Many super-rich foreigners pay in cash and they use offshore companies and anonymous agents to nail property deals. Royal Mansion was a case in point. Its new owner was ‘property mogul’ Hourieh Peramam who bought through a company registered in the British Virgin Islands. When she was 17, Peramam, now 77, fled Kazakhstan on foot for Iran, where she married a doctor and started her property empire. Two years ago she threw open her new home for the party accompanied by her son, an Iranian investor named Hossein Ghandehari, who owns several houses on the same street as the 28,000sq ft Royal Mansion (formerly Toprak Mansion but rather grandly renamed), and his 6ft wife Yassmin.

Foreign rulers and the international moneyed set have not been immune to the recession but recently they have returned to buy up London’s grandest properties at startling prices. ‘We’ve presided over the sale of £150 million worth of trophy properties over the past six months,’ Abrahmsohn says. ‘The oligarchs are back with a vengeance, because international markets have stabilised and the pound-dollar exchange rate is more favourable. The rate of sales is unheard of, even back in 2007, and for the first time we have a shortage of stock.’

New clients come through a network of lawyers, accountants and intermediaries. ‘I am really in the information business,’ says Abrahmsohn. ‘Before we buy and sell any property I gather intelligence. We work like an investment bank.’ Agents like him operate in what he calls ‘a nocturnal world’ where houses are not publicly advertised. ‘Sellers and buyers at the top end crave privacy and secrecy,’ he says, ‘so these properties are offmarket. We operate on a covert basis, nothing is in writing and there are no brochures. It is also known as the “grey market”.’ ‘London is a safe haven for them,’ says Jazmin Atkins, an expert on foreign buyers, who will join Prime Purchase, the property acquisition arm of Savills plc shortly, explaining the huge sums that change hands so readily. The tax laws are friendly, the government is stable, the banks compliant, the judiciary is fair and the city unobtrusive. They like the schools and security is paramount. They are prepared to pay a serious premium for a slice of the London lifestyle. It’s not just about the house.’

On the ‘grey market’ last month, a Middle Eastern buyer paid over £50 million for a house, and other London properties have recently been sold for £20 million each to a Nigerian, Russian and Ukrainian, while a home in Belgrave Square went for £68 million. In 2008, Lakshmi Mittal, the steel billionaire, bought a house on Kensington Palace Gardens for £117 million. And now the Chinese have arrived. A Chinese company, Fong Fun Investments, now owns a historic property in Belgrave Square and earlier this year Hong Kong businessman Joseph Lau paid £33 million for a six storey house on Eaton Square. Three months ago Abrahmsohn received a phone call from a different Chinese billionaire who wants a house in London for his family. Negotiations are ongoing.

The prices these buyers are prepared to pay are startling. In 2008 Brett Palos, stepson of Sir Philip Green and a former private equity boss, sold a house on Avenue Road in St John’s Wood which he had bought in 2006for £7 million. After renovation he expected to then double his money. But he received an offer of £36.2 million from Rinat Akhmetov, a Ukrainian metals billionaire. The deal was completed in September 2008 – at the height of the crunch. Another Ukrainian, metals magnate Andrey Doroshenko, followed suit just two months ago by purchasing the property developer Anthony Lyons’ townhouse on Lyndhurst Road, Hampstead, for an estimated £43 million. And Timur Kulibayev, Prince Andrew’s billionaire friend, and the son-in-law of Kazakhstan’s President Nazarbayev, spent more than £70 million on houses on Upper Grosvenor Street and Green Street, in Mayfair and Holland Park, as well as being linked to paying £15 million for Prince Andrew’s Sunninghill folly, notoriously £3 million more than the asking price.

The estate agent who has prospered most from this super-rich spree is Abrahmsohn. He was one of the agents who brokered the sale of Bernie Ecclestone’s home to Lakshmi Mittal on Kensington Palace Gardens for a record £57.1 million in 2004. His clients include the Saudi royal family, Gerald Ronson, Lebanese businessman Ely Calil, Sir Martin Sorrell, Brunei’s ruling family, Kazakhs and now Chinese billionaires. He also works for Richard Caring, who owns a house in Hampstead Garden Suburb, in the area where Abrahmsohn lives with I his wife Lisa, who runs the contemporary jewellery firm Trellis Jewellery, and his two daughters Lauren, 26, and Olivia, 22.

But when Abrahmsohn collects me for a tour of his North London fiefdom, he arrives in a Smart car. ‘I don’t like to be predictable,’ he shrugs. ‘I like to keep people offguard.’ Abrahmsohn is a classic salesman, charming and attentive but he’s also a cunning, tenacious and unconventional operator. He specialises in assessing potential clients psychologically as well as financially. ‘Death is not the end of the game,’he jokes about his approach to negotiations as we sweep through his terrain, from Kensington to The Bishops Avenue, some of whose houses he has sold several times. ‘This area is a honey pot to which the rich bees fly.’ In northwest London, Glentree International has a virtual monopoly, but in Kensington, Chelsea and Belgravia the market leader is Aylesford, which is in intense competition with Knight Frank and Savills. In Mayfair, Beauchamp Estates dominates the field.

A former dentist, Abrahmsohn was brought up in South Africa and started dealing in property deep in the recession of 1974. He set up shop in a bedroom of a hotel in Golders Green, without even a telephone. But he was bold, brash and his brochures were cheeky and colourful, full of extravagant promises. The tactic worked. He was retained by Greek tycoons who fled after the monarchy was overthrown by a military junta in 1974. He lost some clients – one, Aristos Constantinou, was shot dead by his wife while praying in the chapel of his house (the silver bullet remained embedded in the wall). But Abrahmsohn found the Greeks lucrative.Then came the oil-rich Saudi royals who paid vast amounts for houses such as Beechwood on Hampstead Heath, but preferred to allow their agent, or even their secretary or chauffeur, to conduct negotiations. After the 1979 Islamic revolution in Iran, exiled Iranians moved to London and Abrahmsohn was waiting for them (a very prominent Iranian property investor is Ghandehari, who paid £39.5 million for a house in September 2008).

In the early 1980s one Nigerian chief arrived in Abrahmsohn’s office announcing that he wanted to buy the whole of Winnington Road, Hampstead. After being told that not all the houses on the street were available, he settled for four, because his mistress needed looking after. By 1986, Glentree was making serious money and Abrahmsohn celebrated floating the company by driving to the Stock Exchange in a £150,000 Rolls-Royce Corniche convertible decorated with tinsel and balloons. The agency had increased 30 times in value in six months, and was valued at £65 million. It had become ‘a parable of Thatcherite enterprise’, said one commentator, and duly Lady Thatcher was a guest at Abrahmsohn’s house. The crash and consequent recession of the late 1980s that forced Glentree back into private ownership also brought dollar rich Far Eastern businessmen to town. One Bangladeshi wanted a house on The Bishops Avenue but Abrahmsohn told him: ‘You can’t stop at one. It’s like having one stamp in a collection.’ So he bought seven, over a traditional bowl of Bangladeshi rice pudding. In recent years it has been the Eastern Europeans. Russians choose his area because, says Abrahmsohn, ‘Northwest London properties remind them of their dachas just outside Moscow.

You can buy properties with three acres of land, 15 minutes from the centre of town. And owning a London home is a statement of their wealth and a way of parking their money.’ Many properties are rarely lived in. For 35 years Abrahmsohn has been acting for foreign billionaires and he has become wary of chancers and rogues. He used to represent Asil Nadir, former CEO of Polly Peck, who absconded to the Turkish republic of Cyprus after facing 66 charges of fraud amounting to £34 million in the early 1990s. His forensic vetting system now weeds out the conmen: ‘The key question is whether they have a UK solicitor and a UK bank. If they bank on some obscure island and protest about banking covenants, I become suspicious. My clients crave security and confidentiality and appreciate the need for vetting.’ Abrahmsohn’s negotiating technique is also legendary. ‘It’s a unique style,’ says Richan Caring. ‘He sort of creeps up on you. It’s about relationships. He knows the marketplace well. ‘He is pathologically tenacious,’ one rival told ES. ‘Yes,’ Abrahmsohn confirms. ‘The ninth “No” is a precursor to a “Yes”.’ Today, Abrahmsohn is busy researching the foibles of the newest super rich influx – the Chinese. He is informing himself of the idiosyncrasies, prejudices, eccentricities and negotiating styles. Because now that stock in short supply, prices for trophy houses will increase and it may be that soon only the Chinese will be able to afford them.

Perfect Knowledge is a private company that offers a private fixer service to VIP’s, senior executives and ultra high net worth individuals (UHNWI). We provide a discreet service that manages private and personal affairs on behalf of our clients. Our focus is to ensure total privacy for the individual or organisation at all times. Our services are aimed at private banks, offshore trusts, celebrities, royal family management, private families and discerning individuals where money is no object and discretion is paramount.

www.perfect-knowledge.com

August 10th, 2010 by admin | Comments Off